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Paul FURNEAUX Born 1962 -

Biography

Paul Furneaux is an Edinburgh-based artist with long standing connections to Dumfries and Galloway. He was one of the first ‘artists in residence' in the Gracefield Studio in the early 1990s and has returned occasionally to lead children and adult workshops in printmaking.


Furneaux is originally from Aberdeen and studied at the Edinburgh College of Art from 1982-87 and was awarded a Monbusho scholarship to undertake a Masters in woodblock printing at Tama Art University Japan in 1996 completing his studies in 2000. He has shown his work widely across the UK more recently showed at Gallery Shin Pu Kan, Kyoto, Japan, in the exhibition "Crossflow" showing 5 international artists. He is a contributor to Gracefield's British International Miniature Print exhibition currently touring the UK and Ireland.


He says of his work: ‘I have always admired the prints of the Ukiyoe masters. I subsequently became interested in the many contemporary Japanese printers using some of these limited and simple techniques in contemporary and often complex ways. The underlying themes in my work have remained similar over the years at times less obvious although there to be picked up on if desired. I feel the grain of the wood is an integral part of the finished print. Also the versatility of the hand made Japanese paper "Washi" has allowed me to print not only conventionally on the front of the paper but also through the back of the paper too.'


In the technique of screenprint sections of a fine woven screen (originally silk), which is stretched over a frame, are blocked out. Using a squeegee (rubber blade) ink is pressed through the screen onto a sheet of paper beneath. Only areas of the screen that are not blocked out will allow ink to pass through. Multiple coloured images require many screens and the image has to be carefully registered throughout printing. The artist can create the image in many ways, but at some point the image must be transferred onto (if it is not painted directly onto) transparent film. The films are transferred onto the screens by a light-sensitive process. Images may be transferred photographically onto the screens and printed; this process can be very sophisticated.


Purchased with assistance from the National Fund for Acquisitions administered with Government funds by the National Museum of Scotland.